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Do your bit


Global Warming is a dramatically urgent and serious problem. We don't need to wait for governments to find a solution for this problem: each individual can bring important help adopting a more responsible lifestyle: starting from little, everyday things. It's the only reasonable way to save our planet, before it is too late.

Here is a list of simple things that everyone can do in order to fight against and reduce the Global Warming phenomenon: some of these ideas are at no cost, some other require a little effort or investment but can help you save a lot of money, in the middle-long term!

Replace a regular incandescent light bulb with a compact fluorescent light bulb (cfl)
CFLs use 60% less energy than a regular bulb. This simple switch will save about 300 pounds of carbon dioxide a year.
  • Install a programmable thermostat
Programmable thermostats will automatically lower the heat or air conditioning at night and raise them again in the morning.
  • Choose energy efficient appliances when making new purchases
  • Do not leave appliances on standby
Use the "on/off" function on the machine itself. A TV set that's switched on for 3 hours a day (the average time Europeans spend watching TV) and in standby mode during the remaining 21 hours uses about 40% of its energy in standby mode.
  • Cover your pots while cooking
Doing so can save a lot of the energy needed for preparing the dish. Even better are pressure cookers and steamers: they can save around 70%!
  • Use the washing machine or dishwasher only when they are full
If you need to use it when it is half full, then use the half-load or economy setting. There is also no need to set the temperatures high. Nowadays detergents are so efficient that they get your clothes and dishes clean at low temperatures.
  • Take a shower instead of a bath
A shower takes up to four times less energy than a bath. To maximize the energy saving, avoid power showers and use low-flow showerheads, which are cheap and provide the same comfort.
  • Be sure you’re recycling at home
You can save 2,400 pounds of carbon dioxide a year by recycling half of the waste your household generates.
  • Recycle your organic waste
Around 3% of the greenhouse gas emissions through the methane is released by decomposing bio-degradable waste. By recycling organic waste or composting it if you have a garden, you can help eliminate this problem! Just make sure that you compost it properly, so it decomposes with sufficient oxygen, otherwise your compost will cause methane emissions and smell foul.
  • Plant a tree
A single tree will absorb one ton of carbon dioxide over its lifetime. Shade provided by trees can also reduce your air conditioning bill by 10 to 15%.
  • Buy locally grown and produced foods
  • Buy fresh foods instead of frozen
Frozen food uses 10 times more energy to produce.
  • Eat less meat
Methane is the second most significant greenhouse gas and cows are one of the greatest methane emitters. Their grassy diet and multiple stomachs cause them to produce methane, which they exhale with every breath.

In Puglia last July the average temperature was 10 degrees less than it is this year...........


5 Comments

"In Puglia last July the average temperature was 10 degrees less than it is this year...."

and in 2007 for at least one week it was 10 degrees more.
And... the one thing which would render all the above, noble but near pointless gestures, totally unnecessary, plus stop Italy's inevitable decline into a third-rate industrial power is: a return to sanity with the building of some very necessary modern nuclear power stations! Would also have the minor side-effect of reducing all our electricity bills, or at least halt the inevitable rise in them.

You also omit to mention by far the biggest CO2 generator around here - garden fires, and fires in the olive groves! Hundreds, and tens of thousands of them at certain times. Many illegal, all highly polluting. Also the torching of grass verges, and weeds.

I dispute your figure on TVs, but will now make some measurements to prove the case. I suspect that whoever came up with this result was being very selective on what they measured and where they measured it. All I will say for now is that modern TV's use about one sixth the electricity that early colour sets did, and there are often very good reasons to leave your equipment in standby, the way it was designed to be used. The physical on/off switch should certainly be used if equipment is not going to be used for weeks or months, but not for short periods of non-use like a day or two.
There is a shop in San Vito, near post office where you take your old plastic bottles and they will fill it up with things like, washing up liquid, bleach, liquid detergent etc.
"You also omit to mention by far the biggest CO2 generator around here - garden fires, and fires in the olive groves! Hundreds, and tens of thousands of them at certain times."

Trajan, you have just spoiled one of lifes little pleasures for me - every evening from November to March the highlight of the evening is a blazing log fire in our wood burning stove. Now I am going to feel very guilty about the dire consequences my selfish actions are having on our planet.
"the highlight of the evening is a blazing log fire in our wood burning stove" - hey you've got to keep warm!

What miffs me is all the totally wasted energy out in the olives when people torch the prunings and leaves all over the place to recover the "minerali" - not to mention the clouds of thick smoke which travel for miles. Traditional - yes; efficient and environmentally friendly - NOT!